FET 2: Effective Trainers and Training

To be an effective trainer, one must know not only the specific content that training participants have signed up to learn, but also understand how the human brain is structured as well as how it develops from birth to adulthood and works to acquire, store, and use new information that it receives.

One must apply information about how these structures and processes impact adult learners. Our goal is to create optimal conditions for adult learning that create changes in workplace behavior to improve outcomes for children and families in early care and education settings.

FET 3: Conducive Learning Environments

So far you have been learning about adult learners and some of the important aspects of being an effective trainer. It is time now to learn about the responsibility the trainer has regarding the learning environment. We will look at both the physical and psychological learning environments.

FET 4: Training Design: Professional Development Framework (PDF)

In this course, you will learn about the Professional Development Framework (PDF) that includes the key components to address the needs for Education, Training, and Credentialing of Early Care, Early Intervention, and Early Childhood Education professionals in Kentucky.

Prior to starting the first lesson in this course you should have access to the Professional Development Framework. It will be utilized throughout FET.  Please note this document is 93 pages. If you do not have a pre-printed copy already, you have the option of printing it out or downloading the document for future reference.

To access the document please click on the following link. 

https://kidsnow.ky.gov/professionals/Documents/pd-framework-2011.pdf

Handouts Reminder

📝Handouts for all sections of FET: Training Design (Courses 4-8) are found in 1 single handout. This handout can be found under “Handouts” in FET 1: FET and Trainer Credential Overview. If you did not already print off a copy, you can print a copy off below:📝

FET 5: Training Design: Outlining Training Content

Fundamentals of Effective Training: Training Design is all about how to design a training session.  Training design will include the details, major tasks, and sub tasks that are necessary when designing a training.  Throughout this lesson you will gain information, strategies, and practical opportunities that will support and prepare you to create a focused, sequenced, and active training session.

 When developing a Training Plan there are 7 steps/questions to be answered in order to have an effective and quality training. 

Step 1 – Who?

Step 2 – Why?

Step 3 – When?

Step 4 – Where?

Step 5 – What For?

Step 6 – What?

Step 7 – How?

Each step in developing a training plan asks a question that focuses on an important part of the planning process.  By the end of FET: Training Design you will be familiar with all 7 steps.

The 7 steps for developing a training plan

FET 6: Training Design: Training Methods

Welcome to Training Design: Training Methods.  In the previous lesson you learned about and worked with the needs assessment, identifying workplace and training outcomes, and outlining training content based on the outcomes.  In this Training Methods course, you will get to flex your creative muscle as you build engaging activities and exercises for learners.

FET 9: Face-to-Face Training Day Details

Fundamentals of Effective Training: Face-to-Face Training

We look forward to meeting you in person and hope the following information is helpful as you plan for our upcoming face-to-face session. There are multiple locations and dates for the face-to- face. Please refer to your registration confirmation to verify your specific date and location. If you have any questions about your registration please contact Brandon Cannada at 859-257-4918.

To view full details for each location, click on your date and city.





Training Agenda: Implementation of Training Design

Check in begins at 8:30 a.m. (Local time)

Opening Component

  • Welcome and Introductions
  • Housekeeping
  • Opener

Content Delivery Component

  • Training Design Review
  • Outlining Content
  • Create Training Plan Using PACES™

Lunch – On Your Own – approximately 11:45-12:45 (local time)

  •  Demonstration of Training Methods
  •  Organizational Strategies for Successful Training
  •  Resources for Trainers
  • Tips on Group Facilitation
  • Trainer Credential Application Process

 Closing Component

  •     Evaluation
  •     Question and Answers
  •     Implementation Plan
  •     Summary
  •     Final Housekeeping

Note: A short break will be provided in the morning and in the afternoon.

Lodging:

Participants are responsible for making reservations and covering lodging expenses. 

What to bring:

For your personal comfort, you may want to bring a sweater or jacket. The room may be cool and, typically, we have little control over thermostats.

Please bring your handouts that you have previously printed out. You will be able to insert them into your new FET binder upon arrival. We will be sure to have hole punchers available.

In the meantime, if you have any questions, feel free to contact Brandon Cannada via e-mail: Brandon.Cannada@uky.edu or phone: (859) 257-4918.

For questions the day of the face-to-face session, feel free to call Christine Hausman on her cell at (859) 519-0401. 

Beyond Fundamentals Tech for Trainers: Universal Design & Accessible Documents

The session serves as an introduction to the concepts of Universal Design and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) for professional development. In addition to introducing foundational concepts, this session offers participants examples of how to incorporate UDL into their practices, as well as “take-away” strategies and additional resources for further exploration.

Target Audience: Kentucky Early Care and Education Credentialed Trainers

Hours: 2.5 Adult Learning/How to Train Other Adults

Objectives

  1. 🌐 List reasons why universal design supports all learners.
  2. ♿ Describe the relationship between accessibility and universal design.
  3. 💯 Evaluate a document and make recommendations for how the document can be made more accessible.
  4. 📑 Produce a handout/document free of accessibility errors.

Course Support

Use the Contact Us button at the bottom of every page in the course.

FET 11: Transfer of Learning

When the training is over, it is not really over! This section of FET is going to explore how participants and trainers move beyond the training setting to more completely fulfill the impact that effective training is to have – which is to ‘lead to a change in behavior that provides improved quality of services to children and families.’ This transfer is commonly referred to as the Transfer of Learning.

Effective Training: instructional experiences designed to develop new knowledge, skills and behaviors that are expected to be applied immediately upon or within a short period of time after arrival on or returning to the job.

Transfer of Learning: the intentional and ongoing application of knowledge and implementation of skills and behaviors in the workplace, gained in the training session’s learning experiences.

If trainers design an effective training that includes activities to support the transfer of learning, and participants follow through back in the workplace, the end result is:

  • More involvement from the director.
  • Lasting change in behavior of the staff.
  • Improved outcomes for children and families.

FET 12: Course Wrap Up

Congratulations!  You have completed FET 1-11 and all 17 hours of the Fundamentals of Effective Training hybrid course!  Give yourself a round of applause!

image of four sets of hands clapping

We know that you have spent many hours working hard on learning how to become a more effective trainer and we greatly appreciate all the hard work and effort that you put in during the process.

We hope that your process was smooth and that you are excited to become a trainer and share your knowledge with the Early Childhood Education field.

External Transitions 101: Impacts on Children and Families

External transition is described as the temporary or permanent relocation of a child from one child care setting to another. External transitions may be voluntary, such as when a parent chooses to move a child to a different program because of a change of residence. These transitions may be involuntary when a child is removed from a child care setting as a result of suspension, expulsion, or the child being removed from a program because of intervention from an agency.

This 3-part course series will:

  • Review research showing how moving from one child care setting to another child care setting has an impact on children, families, and child care providers.
  • Review research showing how staying in the same child care setting with the same caregivers can help children develop socially, emotionally, and physically.
  • Review research that supports making changes in the classroom and teacher actions to prevent behavioral problems.
  • Suggest ways to work through behavior problems when they happen.
  • Share ideas on how to create prevention and intervention plans in the classroom and throughout the entire center to lower the number of times a child moves due to behavioral problems.
  • Review ways to support children who must move so that there are less negative impacts on children, families, and the child care provider.

Supports for Community Living: Community Access Training for Community Access Specialists and Supervisors

Moving From Presence to Participation: Supporting People with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities to Belong in Their Local Communities Early Childhood Education providers will not receive credit for this course. Target Audience: Community Access Specialists and Supervisors who provide the Community Access service to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the Supports for Community Living Waiver Length of Course: 6 weeks including required activities with Learning Partner in the Learning Journey and Community Connections Tracking Sheet In this course, you will encounter the following types of activities
  • 💭 Think Spot: An ungraded opportunity to reflect on the topic discussed and likely is tied to the course handout. It is recommended that you download or print the handout to have on hand while you complete this course.
  • 💡 Check Your Knowledge: A graded quiz to check your understanding of the topic(s) covered. Check Your Knowledge quizzes are complete when 80% of the questions are answered correctly. You may take the Check Your Knowledge quizzes multiple times until 80% is achieved.
  • 📹 Embedded Videos: Throughout the course there are videos from various YouTube channels. Many of these videos must be viewed in its entirety before moving on to the next topic. If you encounter a problem with a video please email patti.naber@uky.edu and include the name of the video or topic you are having trouble with.
  • 📚 Required Reading: Required text are specified at the start of the course. You should stop here to complete the required reading.
Required Materials:
  1. Make a Difference: A Guidebook for Person-Centered Direct Support by John O’Brien and Beth Mount available from www.inclusion.com
  2. “Your Learning Journey”available from www.inclusion.com
  3. The Supports for Community Living Regulation regarding Community Access – pgs. 2, 22-23 http://www.lrc.ky.gov/kar/907/012/010.pdf

Preservice Health Training for Student Dentists – Case 2: Hunter

The Preservice Health Training (PHT) modules were designed to educate student and practicing primary care providers about working with individuals having developmental disabilities.

As you work through each case, you make decisions about how to conduct the examination, as well as answer specific questions related to developing a treatment plan.

About The Case

Hunter is a ten year old boy with Down syndrome. The patient is played by an actor with this developmental disability.

In this pediatric case the patient, Hunter, is being seen for a dental checkup. The actor playing Hunter is an individual with Down syndrome.

Observe how best to facilitate effective clinical interactions in this situation.

Preservice Health Training for Medical Students – Case 2: Jay

The Introductory Preservice Health Training modules are designed to provide an overview of treating individuals with developmental disabilities. The Jay case presents a child with autism. In this case, communication challenges are paramount. Behaviors that co-occur for some children with autism are both modeled and described. The tutorials use multi-media, virtual patient instruction.

As you work through each case, you make decisions about how to conduct the examination. You will also be asked to answer specific questions related to developing a treatment plan.

Preservice Health Training for Medical Students – Case 1: Bryan

The Introductory Preservice Health Training modules are designed to provide an overview of treating individuals with developmental disabilities. The Bryan Case features an individual with cerebral palsy (CP) whose presenting issues are confounded with communication difficulties and conditions that frequently co-occur in patients with CP. Related medical issues are briefly described to alert the medical provider to possible needs for additional information. The Jay case presents a child with autism. In this case, communication challenges are paramount. Behaviors that co-occur for some children with autism are both modeled and described. The tutorials use multi-media, virtual patient instruction.

As you work through each case, you make decisions about how to conduct the examination. You will also be asked to answer specific questions related to developing a treatment plan.

Preservice Health Training for Physician Assistants – Case 2: Olivia

Welcome to the PHT Modules, produced by the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky.The PHT Modules were funded by the Kentucky Council for Developmental Disabilities.

The Preservice Health Training (PHT) Modules were designed to improve students’ and practicing clinicians’ comfort level and knowledge for working with patients who have developmental disabilities. The modules were produced in response to the continuing disparity in access to quality healthcare experienced by this patient population.

As you work through each case, you make decisions about how to conduct the examination, as well as answer specific questions related to developing a treatment plan.

Preservice Health Training for Physician Assistants – Case 1: Julia

Welcome to the PHT Modules, produced by the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky.The PHT Modules were funded by the Kentucky Council for Developmental Disabilities.

The Preservice Health Training (PHT) Modules were designed to improve students’ and practicing clinicians’ comfort level and knowledge for working with patients who have developmental disabilities. The modules were produced in response to the continuing disparity in access to quality healthcare experienced by this patient population.

As you work through each case, you make decisions about how to conduct the examination, as well as answer specific questions related to developing a treatment plan.

About The Case

Julia is a 13 year-old patient with Down syndrome being seen for a well-adolescent visit. The patient is played by an actor with this developmental disability.

In this case the patient, Julia, is being seen for a well-child visit. The actor playing Julia is an individual with Down syndrome.

Observe how best to facilitate effective clinical interactions in this situation.

As you go through this case, notice in particular how issues related to communication are addressed.