NCSC Communication Tool Kit for K-12 Students with Severe Disabilities

This series of professional development modules focuses on basic elements of supporting communication and language development in students who do not use oral speech and who also may have intellectual disabilities.

Not only is communication an essential building block for the development of language REQUIRED for access to the general curriculum, communication is an essential life skill.  Student health and safety depends on the extent to which students have regularized gestures, symbols, and augmented or alternative forms of communication.  Now more than ever before, technological enhancements make the goal of communication and language development achievable.

Content developed by: Dr. Jacqui Kearns, Dr. Jane Kleinert, Dr. Judy Page and Lou Ann Land, University of Kentucky

Sponsor: US Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs

2018 Annual Review Guidance for Alternate Assessment Participation (2018 version)

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Course Introduction

In this course, you will encounter the following types of activities:

• Think Spot: An ungraded opportunity to reflect on the topic discussed and likely is tied to the course handout. It is recommended that you download or print the handout to have on hand while you complete this course.

• Check Your Knowledge: A graded quiz to check your understanding of the topic(s) covered. Check Your Knowledge quizzes are complete when 80% of the questions are answered correctly. You may take the Check Your Knowledge quizzes multiple times until 80% is achieved.

Transition 102: Important Predictors for Post-High School Success

Transition 102: Important Predictors for Post-School Success describes the strongest, evidence-based correlates of post-school competitive employment for youth with intellectual  and developmental disabilities.  The second part of the module discusses four additional variables related to successful  transitions for students with significant disabilities, and highlights the resources available to educators and other professionals in Kentucky in putting these predictor variables into practice.

This course is for high school personnel, special education and Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors.

Credit is for EILA and CRC
Credit is NOT available for early care and education providers

Course developed by KentuckyWorks, funded by the US Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Administration for Community Living.

Course Funding

Development of this curriculum (or module, resource) was supported by a grant from the U.S. Administration on Disabilities, Administration on Community Living, (90DNEM0004-01-00), Project Officer:  Larissa Crossen. The contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Administration on Community Living, and no assumption of endorsement by the Federal government should be made.

EMP 101: What We All Need to Know About Transition for Students with Significant Disabilities

This course is for high school personnel, special education and the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. Credit is for EILA and CRC.

Credit is NOT available for early care and education providers

Course developed by KentuckyWorks, funded by the US Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Administration for Community Living.

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About this Course

  • 💡 Check my Answer: these are activities to reflect on the question. Clicking Check my Answer will reveal the correct and incorrect answers.
  • 🎧 Audio: clicking the play button will play the recorded audio for the lesson or topic. The transcript for the audio is available under the player.
  • 📹Embedded Videos: Throughout the course there are videos from various YouTube channels. Many of these videos must be viewed in its entirety before moving on to the next topic.
  • 🏛️ Legal: copied regulation or statute.
  • This course is divided into Lessons and Topics. Each topic must be completed in order to move to the next Lesson.
  • Questions? Use the Contact Us button below.

Photo Credit: Photo Credit: Kentucky Employment Files, Kristi – J. Barrett’s Hair School Nicholasville, KY

Course Funding

The development of this course was supported by a grant from the U.S. Administration on Disabilities, Administration on Community Living, (90DNEM0004-01-00), Project Officer:  Larissa Crossen. The contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Administration on Community Living, and no assumption of endorsement by the Federal government should be made.

SPLASH 101: Scheduling for K-12 Students with Moderate to Severe Disabilities (MSD) – How can I get all of this done?

SPLASH logo with an open book

Scheduling for students with significant intellectual disabilities can be a daunting task especially since we often don’t have control over changes to the master schedule.  This is compounded in most cases by teachers serving multiple grade and ability levels. It is very important to “hit the ground” running with a well-planned schedule at the beginning of each year so that bad habits aren’t formed and routines are clearly established for students and adults.

Course Funding: SPLASH is an initiative of the Kentucky Department of Education’s State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG) funded by the Office of Special Education Programs and managed by the University of Louisville.

SPLASH activities are grounded in research-based practices to increase teacher skill-sets and administrator understanding of indicators of high-quality teaching and learning for students with moderate/severe disabilities (MSD). SPLASH is a program focusing on supporting low incidence teachers across the Commonwealth of Kentucky and bringing rigorous academic instruction for all students.

This course is for special education professionals working in a PK-12 school setting. Credit for early care and education/child care will NOT be issued.