Lesson 7: Transition to Medicaid Waivers or Other Long Term Support Funding

Some of the people you support may also receive services from other agencies. VR provides Supported employment and is the first payment source for service in Kentucky. Particularly, for those of you serving people who receive a Medicaid Waiver (SCL, Michelle P, ABI) – Medicaid is always the payer of last resort. So, you must bill services to VR before you can bill a waiver for supported employment. This online segment will discuss when you can switch to Medicaid funding.

What do I do?

Communicate with the person’s Case Manager. While the OVR Counselor will receive all of the documentation for the phases paid by OVR, you need to be sure the Case Manager knows what is going on.

  • Ask if they would like to receive copies of all the notes and plans.
  • They will need to receive copies of the PCEP and Long Term Support Plan (at 90 days of employment)
  • The Long Term Support Plan will need to be developed with input from the person’s Team.

Lesson 6: Long Term Supports

Now that your consumer has a job, let’s talk about long term supports, which is what makes Supported Employment unique. You will need to know the point of these supports and the minimum requirement for the quiz. Click on the first topic below to get started.

Lesson 5: Job Development

In this lesson, we will look at job development, and how to use the PCEP to guide your job search with that person. You will need to remember some points about employer engagement for the final quiz. Click on the first topic below to get started.

Lesson 4: Person Centered Job Selection

In this lesson, we are going to introduce person centered job selection. This is only an introduction, we will discuss it in depth during Session 2 of the Core Training Series.  However, you will need a basic understanding of this process to pass the final quiz.

Lesson 3: Phases of Traditional Supported Employment

In this lesson, we will examine all the phases of traditional supported employment. There are many steps, and although you won’t have to recite each step, you will need to have a general sense of the phases for the final quiz. Click on the first topic below to get started.

SETP Employment Chart

Lesson 2: Overview of Supported Employment

In this lesson, we will look at the services provided through the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. Click on the first topic below to get started.

Lesson 1: Core Training

This is the first online course of Session 1, which is comprised of 3 online courses in this learning management system, SETP 101, 102, and 103.

This first course provides an overview of Traditional SE, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation process, and what is involved in this service.

After successfully completing the 3 online courses, which make up Session 1, you can complete the series by attending Sessions 2 and 3, each of which is two days of live training. These live training days will dig deeper into the “how-to” of providing supported employment.

Throughout the Supported Employment Core Training Series, we will reference training materials found in an online DropBox. You can find materials here https://www.dropbox.com/sh/xcxwy9d5dsbntqg/AADC74GHdTIjvgdxr6UwLLkPa?dl=0

All Employment Specialists (those providing direct support in any phase of Supported Employment) are required to complete the full Supported Employment Core Training Series

Lesson 6: Preparing to Be a Leader

Leadership is an important quality to foster in all students.  Here are some examples:

Building Leadership

Lesson 5: Preparing for Work in the Community

Inclusion at school and in the community can help students build relationships and confidence that make work possible. Below is one student’s story:

Andy’s Job Story

There are multiple activities a student can engage in the community. Let’s review several examples:

Lesson 4: Preparing for Work

Now, let’s examine strategies for introducing the idea of employment from an early age.

Lesson 6: Americans with Disabilities Act Rights in Emergencies and Pandemics

EM stands in front of a community meeting. About 20 people sit in a meeting room, wearing face masks.
It may not look like it, but the people in this room are socially distanced. There is an American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreter in this room to sign for anyone who needs it.

⌛This lesson will take about one hour to complete, although every learner moves at their own pace.

This course is intended to help local disability organizations strengthen engagement with local emergency and public health preparedness planners, with the goal of getting a seat at the local emergency planning table.

Learning Objectives

After completing today’s visit (lesson), you will be able to:

• Identify Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) issues related to emergency planning
• Identify “reasonable modifications” (reasonable accommodations) and “undue financial or administrative burdens” under the ADA


The following is alt text for an image. The Prepared4ALL logo shows three figures seated at a table. A collective speech bubble above them says Prepared4ALL.

This course may help increase your knowledge about whole community emergency planning (including COVID-19) and share basic information for you to connect with your own local emergency managers, public health planners, and community.

After arriving in Disasterville you will hear from Disasterville’s professionals and community members and assist them with whole community inclusive emergency planning. You’ll learn about the Prepared4ALL process for local emergency planning collaboration. Local emergency and public health preparedness planners, the ADA Coordinator, and others from Disasterville will talk about what local planners may not know about people with disabilities. They’ll explain Prepared4ALL Action teams, how to hold Active Planning meetings, and how the U.S. local emergency planning system works.

As you meet Disasterville professionals and community members, you will be asked to make decisions and answer questions to check your learning about inclusive and accessible local emergency planning.

You must visit Disasterville 8 times to earn a Prepared4ALL Certificate of Completion.

If you need tech support help, please scroll to the bottom of the page and select the “Contact Us” button and a team member will reach out to you for assistance within one business day.

All characters, locales, businesses, and other entities appearing in this training course are fictional. Any resemblance to real persons, whether living or dead, real locales, businesses and other entities is purely coincidental. The content and materials for this course are for informational purposes only and are not to be considered legal or medical advice. For legal advice please consult an attorney and for medical advice please consult a healthcare provider.

accessibility widget logo showing a stick figure person surrounded by a blue circle

We are committed to providing this course to all people. In the upper right corner of every page, you will find our accessibility menu. Clicking the menu will provide a variety of options that may help you to complete the course. If you have any ideas on making this course more accessible, please contact us.

Lesson 7: Whole Community Emergency Planning

EM stands in front of a community meeting. About 20 people sit in a meeting room, wearing face masks.
It may not seem like it but the people in this room are socially distanced. There is an American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreter in this room to sign for anyone who needs it.

⌛This lesson will take about one hour to complete, although every learner moves at their own pace.

This course is intended to help local disability organizations strengthen engagement with local emergency and public health preparedness planners, with the goal of getting a seat at the local emergency planning table.

Learning Objectives

After completing today’s visit (lesson), you will be able to:

• Define whole community

• Identify local whole community planning activities and distinguish them from planning activities that do not indicate whole community planning

• Explain “access and functional needs” and how to use the Communication, Maintaining Health, Independence, Support & Safety, and Transportation (CMIST) framework

• Identify someone’s CMIST needs and decide how to address them


The following is alt text for an image. The Prepared4ALL logo shows three figures seated at a table. A collective speech bubble above them says Prepared4ALL.

This course may help increase your knowledge about whole community emergency planning (including COVID-19) and share basic information for you to connect with your own local emergency managers, public health planners, and community.

In the course you will take on the role of “Terrye Trainee,” from Tornado Gap County, USA. Terrye is a professional from Tornado Gap’s local disability organization, Access & Equity, Inc. Tornado Gap’s county government and local disability and other community organizations want to collaborate to identify and close emergency planning gaps related to people with disabilities, chronic and mental health conditions.

Terrye has heard about Disasterville’s inclusive emergency planning success and is visiting neighboring Disasterville to learn from their work.

After arriving in Disasterville you will hear from Disasterville’s professionals and community members and assist them with whole community inclusive emergency planning. You’ll learn about the Prepared4ALL process for local emergency planning collaboration. Local emergency and public health preparedness planners, the ADA Coordinator, and others from Disasterville will talk about what local planners may not know about people with disabilities. They’ll explain Prepared4ALL Action teams, how to hold Active Planning meetings, and how the U.S. local emergency planning system works.   

As you meet Disasterville professionals and community members, you will be asked to make decisions and answer questions to check your learning about inclusive and accessible local emergency planning. 

You must visit Disasterville 8 times to earn a Prepared4ALL Certificate of Completion. 

If you need tech support help, please scroll to the bottom of the page and select the “Contact Us” button, and a team member will reach out to you for assistance within one business day. 

All characters, locales, businesses, and other entities appearing in this training course are fictional. Any resemblance to real persons, whether living or dead, real locales, businesses and other entities is purely coincidental. The content and materials for this course are for informational purposes only and are not to be considered legal or medical advice. For legal advice please consult an attorney and for medical advice please consult a healthcare provider.

accessibility widget logo showing a stick figure person surrounded by a blue circle

We are committed to providing this course to all people. In the upper right corner of every page, you will find our accessibility menu. Clicking the menu will provide a variety of options that may help you to complete the course. If you have any ideas on making this course more accessible, please contact us.

Brain Based Teaching and Learning: Total Participation Techniques (TPTs)

TPTs incorporate both high cognition AND high participation in activities. TPTs are teaching techniques that allow ALL trainees to demonstrate, AT THE SAME TIME, active participation and cognitive engagement on the content being covered.

TPTs allow teachers to get evidence of active participation and cognitive engagement from all trainees at the same time, and are practical remedies for the traditional Q & A. When it comes to asking higher-order questions, it is not enough that we create higher-order questions. We also need to follow through by making sure all of our trainees actually take the time to answer them. For that, we need to embed opportunities within classroom structures that allow for all trainees to respond. In other words, when it comes to engaging trainees in higher-order Q & A, calling on someone is fine, but sequentially, it should be the last thing that you do.

Lesson 8: The Active Planning Process and How to Hold Community Stakeholder Meetings

EM stands in front of a community meeting. About 20 people sit in a meeting room, wearing face masks.

It may not look like it but the people in this room are socially distanced. There is an American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreter in this room to sign for anyone who needs it.

⌛This lesson will take about one hour to complete, although every learner moves at their own pace.

Learning Objectives

After completing today’s “visit” (lesson), you will be able to:

• Describe the purpose of the Active Planning Workbook

• Describe the components of Community Stakeholder Meetings  


The following is alt text for an image. The Prepared4ALL logo shows three figures seated at a table. A collective speech bubble above them says Prepared4ALL.

This course may help increase your knowledge about whole community emergency planning (including COVID-19) and share basic information for you to connect with your own local emergency managers, public health planners, and community.

In the course, you will take on the role of “Terrye Trainee,” from Tornado Gap County, USA.

Terrye is a professional from Tornado Gap’s local disability organization, Access & Equity, Inc. Tornado Gap’s county government and local disability and other community organizations want to collaborate to identify and close emergency planning gaps related to people with disabilities, chronic and mental health conditions. Terrye has heard about Disasterville’s inclusive emergency planning success and is visiting neighboring Disasterville to learn from their work.  

After arriving in Disasterville you will “hear” from Disasterville’s professionals and community members and “assist” them with whole community inclusive emergency planning. You’ll learn about the Prepared4ALL process for local emergency planning collaboration. Local emergency and public health preparedness planners, the ADA Coordinator, and others from Disasterville will talk about what local planners may not know about people with disabilities. They’ll explain Prepared4ALL Action teams, how to hold Active Planning meetings, and how the U.S. local emergency planning system works. 

As you meet Disasterville professionals and community members, you will be asked to make decisions and answer questions to check your learning about inclusive and accessible local emergency planning. 

You must visit Disasterville 8 times to earn a Prepared4ALL Certificate of Completion. 

If you need tech support help, please scroll to the bottom of the page and select the “Contact Us” button, and a team member will reach out to you for assistance within one business day.  

All characters, locales, businesses, and other entities appearing in this training course are fictional. Any resemblance to real persons, whether living or dead, real locales, businesses and other entities is purely coincidental. The content and materials for this course are for informational purposes only and are not to be considered legal or medical advice. For legal advice please consult an attorney and for medical advice please consult a healthcare provider.

accessibility widget logo showing a stick figure person surrounded by a blue circle

We are committed to providing this course to all people. In the upper right corner of every page, you will find our accessibility menu. Clicking the menu will provide a variety of options that may help you to complete the course. If you have any ideas on making this course more accessible, please contact us.

Lesson 5: Disability Demographics, Community Living, Communication and Accessible Meetings

EM stands in front of a community meeting. About 20 people sit in a meeting room, wearing face masks.
It may not look like it but the people in this room are socially distanced. There is an American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreter signing for anyone who needs it.

⌛This lesson will take about one hour to complete, although every learner moves at their own pace.

This course is intended to help local disability organizations strengthen engagement with local emergency and public health preparedness planners, with the goal of getting a seat at the local emergency planning table.

Learning Objectives

After completing today’s visit (lesson), you will be able to:

• Describe the kinds of information local emergency and public health preparedness planners may not know about the disability community.

• Describe the presence of people with disabilities in the community and relate that to local emergency planning needs.

• Apply the STATE (Same Time Access To Everyone) concept to accessible communication related to emergencies/disasters/pandemics (including COVID-19).

• Identify plain language text versus text that is not plain language and describe the importance of plain language text.

• Identify elements of an inclusive meeting.


The following is alt text for an image. The Prepared4ALL logo shows three figures seated at a table. A collective speech bubble above them says Prepared4ALL.

This course may help increase your knowledge about whole community emergency planning (including COVID-19) and share basic information for you to connect with your own local emergency managers, public health planners, and community.

In the course, you will take on the role of “Terrye Trainee,” from Tornado Gap County, USA. Terrye is a professional from Tornado Gap’s local disability organization, Access & Equity, Inc. 

Tornado Gap’s county government and local disability and other community organizations want to collaborate to identify and close emergency planning gaps related to people with disabilities, chronic and mental health conditions.  Terrye has heard about Disasterville’s inclusive emergency planning success and is visiting neighboring Disasterville to learn from their work.  

After arriving in Disasterville you will hear from Disasterville’s professionals and community members and assist them with whole community (inclusive) emergency planning. You’ll learn about the Prepared4ALL process for local emergency planning collaboration. Local emergency and public health preparedness planners, the ADA Coordinator, and others from Disasterville will talk about what local planners may not know about people with disabilities. They’ll explain Prepared4ALL Action teams, how to hold Active Planning meetings, and how the U.S. local emergency planning system works. 

As you meet Disasterville professionals and community members, you will be asked to make decisions and answer questions to check your learning about inclusive and accessible local emergency planning. 

You must visit Disasterville 8 times to earn a Prepared4ALL Certificate of Completion. 

If you need tech support help, please scroll to the bottom of the page and select the “Contact Us” button, and a team member will reach out to you for assistance within one business day.  

All characters, locales, businesses, and other entities appearing in this training course are fictional. Any resemblance to real persons, whether living or dead, real locales, businesses and other entities is purely coincidental. The content and materials for this course are for informational purposes only and are not to be considered legal or medical advice. For legal advice please consult an attorney and for medical advice please consult a healthcare provider.

accessibility widget logo showing a stick figure person surrounded by a blue circle

We are committed to providing this course to all people. In the upper right corner of every page, you will find our accessibility menu. Clicking the menu will provide a variety of options that may help you to complete the course. If you have any ideas on making this course more accessible, please contact us.

Lesson 4: The American Emergency Planning System & Taking Action

EM stands in front of a community meeting. About 20 people sit in a meeting room, wearing face masks.

It may not look like it but the people in this room are socially distanced. There is an American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreter in this room to sign for anyone who needs it.

⌛This lesson will take about one hour to complete, although every learner moves at their own pace.

This course is intended to help local disability organizations strengthen engagement with local emergency and public health preparedness planners, with the goal of getting a seat at the local emergency planning table.

Learning Objectives

After completing today’s visit (lesson), you will be able to:

• Identify the parts of the American emergency management system

• Describe the parts of the local emergency management system and how they work

• Explain how disability issues fit within the emergency management system


The following is alt text for an image. The Prepared4ALL logo shows three figures seated at a table. A collective speech bubble above them says Prepared4ALL.

This course may help increase your knowledge about whole community emergency planning (including COVID-19) and share basic information for you to connect with your own local emergency managers, public health planners, and community.

In the course, you will take on the role of “Terrye Trainee,” from Tornado Gap County, USA. Terrye is a professional from Tornado Gap’s local disability organization, Access & Equity, Inc. Tornado Gap’s county government and local disability and other community organizations want to collaborate to identify and close emergency planning gaps related to people with disabilities, chronic and mental health conditions. Terrye has heard about Disasterville’s inclusive emergency planning success and is visiting neighboring Disasterville to learn from their work.

After arriving in Disasterville you will hear from Disasterville’s professionals and community members and assist them with whole community inclusive emergency planning. You’ll learn about the Prepared4ALL process for local emergency planning collaboration. Local emergency and public health preparedness planners, the ADA Coordinator, and others from Disasterville will talk about what local planners may not know about people with disabilities. They’ll explain Prepared4ALL Action teams, how to hold Active Planning meetings, and how the U.S. local emergency planning system works.

As you meet Disasterville professionals and community members, you will be asked to make decisions and answer questions to check your learning about inclusive and accessible local emergency planning.

You must visit Disasterville 8 times to earn a Prepared4ALL Certificate of Completion.

If you need tech support help, please scroll to the bottom of the page and select the “Contact Us” button, and a team member will reach out to you for assistance within one business day.

All characters, locales, businesses, and other entities appearing in this training course are fictional. Any resemblance to real persons, whether living or dead, real locales, businesses and other entities is purely coincidental. The content and materials for this course are for informational purposes only and are not to be considered legal or medical advice. For legal advice please consult an attorney and for medical advice please consult a healthcare provider.

accessibility widget logo showing a stick figure person surrounded by a blue circle

We are committed to providing this course to all people. In the upper right corner of every page, you will find our accessibility menu. Clicking the menu will provide a variety of options that may help you to complete the course. If you have any ideas on making this course more accessible, please contact us.