TOPIC 3.1: “Breaking Down” HELP® Domains into HELP® Strands

As introduced in Lesson 2, in the HELP® Strands protocol, the HELP® skills remain the same.  However, the traditional six broad domains of the HELP® Checklist have been further grouped into concepts called Strands.

Each Strand includes HELP® skills that focus upon a specific underlying key concept, so that one skill builds the foundation for the next skill.

In addition, some (but not all) domains have “sub-domains” and some (but not all) strands have “sub-strands.” See examples below to help clarify, and follow along in your Strands protocol.

First Example: Fine Motor Domain 4.0, Sub-Domains I and II, and Sub-Strands

For an example of how skills are grouped by concept, turn to the Fine Motor domain in your Strands booklet, on pages 18 to 21.

Notice the domain of Fine Motor, 4.0, and sub-domain 4.I Foundations beginning on page 18, and sub-domain 4.II Perceptual-Motor Integration, beginning on page 20. Within sub-domain 4.II, there is Strand 4-6: Spatial Perception and Planning on page 20. Under Strand 4-6, there are 4 sub-strands: 4-6A includes Pre-Writing; sub-strand 4-6B includes Block Construction; sub-strand 4-6C includes Formboard, and 4-6D is Paper Activities. Within each sub-strand, you can be sure that one skill is related to and leads to the next. This allows for easier crediting of related skills and indicates next skills for the child to learn for that concept.

Since skills were regrouped into strands, skill numbers are not always sequential and may have age and number gaps.

 

Another Example: Cognitive Domain 1.0, 2 of 7 Sub-Strands

The flow chart for the cognitive domain 1 that shows how the skills are split between strands 1-1 and 1-4

This is an important graphic for understanding the organization of the Strands. Find these 2 Strands in your protocol on pages 4 and 5. If you look at Cognitive Domain 1.0 > Strand 1-1: Development of symbolic play, you will see that for Strand 1-1 at the top of the page, skills 1.13, 1.15, 4.39, and 1.35 are the first four skills in the Strand. They are arranged in hierarchical order within the strand, starting at 2 and a half months of age and extending to 6 – 9 months. These skills all relate to the concept of this Strand, but are not in numerical order since they originated in the Checklist, which is arranged numerically.

Help! How do I Create Exciting, Accessible Spaces for ALL Children? LD GL

room arrangement 1

This 1-hour course is an introduction to creating accessible spaces for children with special needs in early care settings. The course includes interactive, low budget ideas for successfully integrating children with special needs in all areas and activities. This course explores various ways to improve room arrangement for inclusive activities.

Help! How do I Create Exciting, Accessible Spaces for ALL Children? LD GP

room arrangement 1

This 1-hour course is an introduction to creating accessible spaces for children with special needs in early care settings. The course includes interactive, low budget ideas for successfully integrating children with special needs in all areas and activities. This course explores various ways to improve room arrangement for inclusive activities.

ECE: Help! How do I Create Exciting, Accessible Spaces for ALL Children?

room arrangement 1

This 1-hour course is an introduction to creating accessible spaces for children with special needs in early care settings. The course includes interactive, low budget ideas for successfully integrating children with special needs in all areas and activities. This course explores various ways to improve room arrangement for inclusive activities.

ECE: Help! How do I Support the Emotional Health of Young Children?

This 3-hour course will introduce how emotional health is defined, why it is important, key relationships that influence young children’s emotional development, and the components of emotional health, including temperament styles.

The session will be interactive and thought-provoking, with participants actively completing activities to explore their own temperament style, and making a toolbox of activity cards that can guide children’s emotional development.

Help! How do I Teach my Children Self-Regulation? LD GL

children playing with cars

If you have children in your care who are aggressive, have sleep difficulty, under-developed play skills or difficulty managing their energy level,  you likely have a child who cannot self-regulate. Young children who have developed self-regulation find it easier to take turns, make friends, adapt to routines, follow rules, and problem solve. In this course, you will understand what self-regulation is, what areas of difficulty are most frequently seen in children with self-regulation concerns, and the strategies you can implement to help children control their mood, calm themselves, and handle change.

Content Developed by: Caroline Gooden and Julie Kraska

Target Audience: Early Care and Education providers

Help! How do I Teach my Children Self-Regulation? LD GP

children playing with cars

If you have children in your care who are aggressive, have sleep difficulty, under-developed play skills or difficulty managing their energy level,  you likely have a child who cannot self-regulate. Young children who have developed self-regulation find it easier to take turns, make friends, adapt to routines, follow rules, and problem solve. In this course, you will understand what self-regulation is, what areas of difficulty are most frequently seen in children with self-regulation concerns, and the strategies you can implement to help children control their mood, calm themselves, and handle change.

Content Developed by: Caroline Gooden and Julie Kraska

Target Audience: Early Care and Education providers

ECE: Help! How do I Teach my Children Self-Regulation?

children playing with cars

If you have children in your care who are aggressive, have sleep difficulty, under-developed play skills or difficulty managing their energy level,  you likely have a child who cannot self-regulate. Young children who have developed self-regulation find it easier to take turns, make friends, adapt to routines, follow rules, and problem solve. In this course, you will understand what self-regulation is, what areas of difficulty are most frequently seen in children with self-regulation concerns, and the strategies you can implement to help children control their mood, calm themselves, and handle change.

Content Developed by: Caroline Gooden and Julie Kraska

Target Audience: Early Care and Education providers